Peter-Paul Koch and the browser dilemma

In July of this year, mobile platform strategist, consultant, and trainer, Peter-Paul Koch (PPK), published an article on his blog, Quirksmode, called “Stop pushing the web forward.” When PPK publishes, people tend to listen and at AREA 17, we’re no different.

Peter-Paul Koch and the browser dilemma

PPK always sparks debate

More


2014: Year in Review

2014: Year in Review

2014 was a big year at AREA 17. We had the opportunity to work with some amazing new clients, develop deeper partnerships with existing ones, have our voices heard from coast to coast (and country to country), soak up some California sun, and come back home again to expanding studios in Paris and New York. We wished a few old friends the best in new adventures and welcomed a cadre of talented new colleagues hailing from as far away as Dubai and Detroit and as close as Long Island and Brooklyn Heights.

More


Details. Details. Details.

Details. Details. Details.

I recently came across an interesting article by Simon Owens on the Nieman Lab’s site called “It’s small touches that can make a difference in New York’s layouts.”  The piece starts with a simple observation:

More


Designers, step away from your computers: A missive in support of field research

Designers, step away from your computers: A missive in support of field research

airbnb gets a redesign

When airbnb released its new site design and rebrand by DesignStudio this summer it caused an uproar, to put it mildly. There was so much written about the work that it seemed even the most sheepish designers poked their heads out from behind their monitors to weigh in.

More


(De)sign of the Times: Adaptive Information Architecture, Larry Wall, Cow-trails and Master-plans

The following is a result of ongoing conversations about where online design has been and where it could go. These discussions led directly to the doorstep of Larry Wall, inventor of the Perl programming language. Love Perl or hate it, Larry’s thoughts on the constraints presented by web design are well worth serious consideration — even 16 years later.

(De)sign of the Times: Adaptive Information Architecture, Larry Wall, Cow-trails and Master-plans

UC Berkeley user paths. Photo, Peter Merholz

Eugene Kim: Would it be accurate to say that Perl doesn’t enforce good design?

LW: No, it does not. It tries to give you some tools to help if you want to do that, but I’m a firm believer that a language — whether it’s a natural language or a computer language — ought to be an amoral artistic medium.

“A Conversation with Larry Wall,” Dr. Dobbs, 1998

Something’s always struck me as odd about interactive, online design. Considering the immensely social nature of the medium, it’s shocking how often it seems to exist in a bubble — or rather a box. Websites, mobile and iPad applications are all designed and developed by a group of people or individuals usually with the hope of mass consumption. And yet despite all that (hoped for) human traffic, most mass sites feel more like cloistered, master-planned suburbs rather than thriving, ever-changing and evolving cities.

More